So you're having a...

Congrats to adding to your family! Pregnancy, birthing, and nutritional information after birth can be a lot to keep up with. We’ve got you covered. In addition to bringing them in to see us, we have some tips for the new babies in your life!

Kittens

Isn’t it just so fun to have a new kitten at home? Once you’ve gotten past the cuteness of the situation, we’re here to help you with the important medical decisions that come next!

First up, vaccinations!

8 Weeks
First Kitten Vaccinations (FVR)
First Deworming

12 Weeks
Booster Kitten Vaccination (FVR)
Leukemia Test and Vaccination (FeLV)
Rabies Vaccination
Second Deworming

16 Weeks
Booster Leukemia Vaccination (FeLV)

4-6 Months
Spay or Neuter

Humans aren’t the only ones that need to examine their current health state annually. For the rest of your cat’s life, they’ll need yearly boosters on its vaccinations, as well as a yearly deworming. The following three vaccinations will protect your cat from dangerous diseases and let you rest easy.

The Kitten Vaccination (FVR), also known as a distemper vaccination, is one injection that protects your cat against the very common and serious diseases, viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia. As shown in the recommended schedule, kittens need to receive the injection twice, once at 8 weeks of age and once at about 12 weeks of age. Thereafter, an annual booster is needed each and every year to maintain protection.

The Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccination (FeLV) is an injection that protects your cat against the incurable and fatal disease, feline leukemia. As shown in the above schedule kittens need to receive this injection twice. Once at about 12 weeks and once at about 16 weeks. An annual booster is needed each and every year thereafter to maintain protection. We recommend testing your kitten for feline leukemia prior to vaccination.

The Rabies Vaccination is an injection that protects your cat against the fatal disease rabies. This vaccination is required by law as humans can contract rabies. Your cat will need an initial injection at 12 weeks, a booster one year from the initial, and thereafter every other year for his or her life.

Information on the Feline Birth Process

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Puppies

Isn’t it just so fun to have a new kitten at home? Once you’ve gotten past the cuteness of the situation, we’re here to help you with the important medical decisions that come next!

6 Weeks
First Puppy Vaccination (DHPP)
First Deworming

8 Weeks
Booster Puppy Vaccination (DHPP)

12 Weeks
Booster Puppy Vaccination (DHPP)
Rabies Vaccination
Second Deworming

16 Weeks
Booster Puppy Vaccination (DHPP)

4-6 Months
Spay or Neuter for small to medium breeds
Consult a veterinarian for spay/neuter age on large and giant breeds

It doesn’t stop there! Each year of your dog’s life, they’ll need yearly boosters on its vaccinations, as well as an annual deworming. It’s especially important to protect them from the following diseases.

Puppy Vaccination (DHPP), also known as a distemper-parvo shot, is one injection that protects your puppy against the severe and often fatal diseases, distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza. As the recommended schedule shows, puppies require a series of these injections beginning at 6-8 weeks of age and continuing every four weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks of age to ensure that they develop a protective immunity. Adult dogs are susceptible to these diseases as well to maintain their immunity they require a yearly booster.

The Rabies Vaccination is an injection that protects your dog against the fatal disease rabies. The vaccination is required by law as humans can contract rabies. Your dog will need an initial injection at 12 weeks, a booster on year from the initial, and after that every other year for his or her life.

Heartworm Prevention in Wyoming is recommended May thru Oct. each year. Our doctors advise the use of Heartgard Plus as a monthly treatment during the mosquito season, to prevent your dog from becoming infected with heartworms. If your dog was not on heartworm prevention medication during the previous year, we strongly recommend a blood test be done before treatment with Heartgard.

So You’re Going to Have Puppies

Let’s get you prepared.

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Large Animals

Animal Medical Center of Wyoming offers comprehensive services to manage the health care needs of these larger animals, either in-house or on-site at your farm or stable. Whether you’re raising your large animals for pleasure, work or show, you’ll find everything you need with us!

It’s true, sometimes our beautiful large animals were once small, adorable babies. Below, we have some great resources to help you before and after their birth.

The Importance of Colostrum in Calves

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Nutrition in Foals

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Newborn Calf Survival Tips

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Use Of pH Testing Of Milk To Predict Foaling Time In Mares

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Have questions for our staff?

Please complete the form below and a member of our staff will get back to you as quickly as possible. If this is an emergency situation during business hours, please call us at 307-682-1507.